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Putzmeister Brazil at Work on São Paulo Road Ring Project




Putzmeister Brazil is contributing to one of the most significant road projects underway in Brazil today, the São Paulo Metropolitan Road Ring.

Putzmeister Brazil at Work on São Paulo Road Ring Project

Putzmeister Brazil, a subsidiary of Putzmeister America, Inc., is contributing to one of the most significant road projects underway in Brazil today, the São Paulo Metropolitan Road Ring. Nearly 50 workers from a Spanish company specializing in tunnels, Ossa Obras Subterrâneas (Ossa), are using Putzmeister equipment in the north loop of the Road Ring Mário Covas (SP-021).


Ossa is tunneling underground in Lots 4 and 5, totaling approximately 4,920 feet (1,500m) with the help of six Putzmeister SPM 500 robotic concrete spraying systems, two Putzmeister Thom-Katt® TK 40 Trailer-Mounted Concrete/Shotcrete Pumps and two Putzmeister 36Z-Meter Truck-Mounted Concrete Boom Pumps. At each tunnel jobsite, the work progresses, on average, three feet (one meter) per day. The purpose of the tunnels is to minimize the environmental impact on the Cantareira Mountains region, where the northern stretch of the road passes, representing one of the most preserved areas of the Metropolitan Region of São Paulo (MRSP). The site is home to unique flora and fauna and is one of the last remnants of Atlantic Forest in the MRSP.


According to Ossa engineer Luis Gonzalo Garcia, who is responsible for the construction of the tunnels in the road ring, the job requires the application of advanced technology, since drilling requires constant attention and a lot of planning. He notes that the type of soil found in the Cantareira region contains much clay and rock, which makes for difficult conditions for the equipment, but states that Putzmeister equipment always overcomes the environmental challenges.


“Our company has always used Putzmeister equipment, which meets our technical requirements and ensures security and reliability,” says Garcia.


With the SPM 500 robotic concrete spraying systems, Putzmeister offers the latest technology in concrete tunneling equipment. The equipment, manufactured in Spain and developed by German engineers, is ideal for medium and large tunnels and offers a vertical spraying reach of nearly 56 feet (17m) and a concrete flow of 39 cubic yards (36m3) per hour. All the machine functions are available in the remote control, including automatic spraying sequence start and stop functions. It also allows the operator full regulation of concrete output, as well as adjustments to the predefined additive dosage.


“We offer the best solutions for pumping and transporting concrete in underground applications,” says Francisco Antunes Sousa, sales manager for Putzmeister Underground in Brazil. “As used on the road ring project, our SPM 500 concrete spraying systems are the only type of this kind in the country.”


For this project, the SPM 500’s spray a layer of concrete approximately two inches (50mm) thick onto the tunnel walls of the containment structure, which subsequently provides support for the entire structure.


One way the crew has optimized work on the project is by minimizing the downtime for maintenance due to parts replacement or repairs. Right on site, there are a variety of spare parts available for quick and easy access. Additionally, Putzmeister is providing after-sales service and support with a service technician available on site to assist with any maintenance needs.


“With this solution, we want to increase the timelessness of preventive and corrective maintenance for the project’s equipment,” says director of post-sale for Putzmeister, Felipe Rix Hrdlicka.


The Mário Covas Road Ring (SP-21), also known as the São Paulo Metropolitan Road Ring, is a highway about (112 miles) 180km long with six lanes and a shoulder being built around the metropolitan region of São Paulo. The purpose is to relieve the heavy truck traffic coming from the state and the various regions of the country to São Paulo, causing serious congestion and pollution.


The project’s first section opened in 2002, as the North loop. The latter is expected to be delivered in 2016.


This northern stretch will be 27 miles (44 km) long with seven miles (12km) of it being in tunnels. It will connect the West and East loops, allowing access to Fernão Dias (BR-381) highway and São Paulo International Airport (GRU).