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Hello Hollywood … Good Bye Access


D&N Concrete Pumping of Gardena, Calif., used a Putzmeister 52Z-Meter boom pump to pour the upper wall sections of the Kodak Theatre. The Hollywood revitalization project will use more than 200,000+cubic yards (152,910 m3) of concrete by the time it's completed in March 2002. Photo by Warren Aerial Photography

A faster approach than placing concrete with a crane for the hotel renovation offered by D&N Concrete Pumping of Gardena, Calif., was to use a Putzmeister MXR 32/36 separate placing boom with its 105-foot (32m) horizontal reach and the TG 10 square tower with its uniquely designed hydraulic self-climbing configuration. Photo by Warren Aerial Photography

Hello Hollywood … Good Bye Access

More than 9.5 million people visit Hollywood Boulevard annually to see the hand imprints of famous movie stars embedded in concrete. Yet, by looking across the street, they'll find over 836 more hands working on a major revitalization project in the re-birth of Hollywood. It's a high profile project encompassing much more concrete — in fact, a mind-boggling 200,000+cubic yards (152,910m3).

At the pivotal intersection of Hollywood and Highland just beneath the well-known "Hollywood" sign in the nearby hills, three major construction projects under the name of "Hollywood & Highland" are going on simultaneously. The ultimate goal is to create a one-of-a-kind tourist attraction and bring substantial economic growth to the city.

Three Projects Shaping Up Under Hollywood & Highland
One focal point in drawing visitors will be the new 136,000-square-foot (12,634m2) Kodak Theater - the world's first state-of-the-art theater designed specifically for live broadcast productions and home of the Academy Awards® presentations in March 2002. It is destined to be one of the most photographed locations in Hollywood and estimated to attract 20 million visitors annually.

Also being undertaken is an entertainment retail district for numerous world-class retailers to showcase merchandise in never-before-seen presentations along with film studio facilities, high-impact restaurants and attractions found nowhere else. Adding further appeal to the location, the project will sit atop a Metrorail Red Line station that will connect to downtown Los Angeles and Universal Studios. The project will have a special bus area for visitors as well as a new 3,000-car underground parking structure when fully operational in fall 2001.

Finally there's the renovation of an adjoining Holiday Inn into a 640-room, four star Renaissance hotel by Marriott with 40,000 square feet (3,716m2) of additional meeting space also under construction. Although each project's portion offers its own special uniqueness to the overall plan, they all share a common problem - construction job site access.

Access — the Biggest Hurdle
Access is extremely difficult due to the unusual site logistics and enormous project size, covering three city blocks in the busy California district. Plus, state highway boundaries restrict construction equipment to set up on the streets even though the project is being built right to the property line. The intense coordination of cranes, pumping equipment, mixer deliveries, tower erection, pre-cast and structural steel plans required a well-drafted script with some added impromptu scenes along the way.

Nevertheless, at a projected total cost of $567 million, contractors are turning aggressive plans to revitalize downtown Hollywood into reality. Because this would be the first major tourist destination in the heart of Los Angeles to generate revenue for the city, local government officials were anxious to proceed. However, they wanted to advance the project at a next-to-impossible pace.

In July 1998, old structures were overturned and the largest hole ever dug in Southern California evolved — taking out over 600,000 cubic yards (458,730m3) of dirt to depths 80 feet (24m) below grade. And just a few months later, the project began to emerge from the ground, all in an effort to meet a March 2002 completion date for all phases.

D&N Concrete Pumping of Gardena, Calif., was the exclusive concrete pumping contractor for all three projects under the Hollywood & Highland plan. From their modern fleet of Putzmeister boom pumps, Telebelt conveyors, separate placing booms and trailer pumps, every model and size was utilized in one phase or another. The equipment worked almost daily and most weekends to meet the unquestionably tight deadlines while battling with access issues.

As the formation of the site was in the shape of a "U," only one main center access ramp was available. As street setup was not permitted, the center ramp was used to first help reach the outside building edges next to the property lines. The smaller sized 16-, 24Z-, and 32S -Meter boom pumps were initially used for the smaller retail stores. These units were ideal due to their compact outrigger spreads and very low unfolding heights, which allowed access into very tight and congested areas. Eventually this center means of access was closed up as the project moved inward.

Therefore, as the project expanded upward and inward, the longer reach of the 36, 42X, 46X and 52Z Putzmeister boom pumps became paramount, especially as the 127-foot-high (38m) theater grew in size. Although three large M250 cranes were on-site, the Putzmeister pumps placed all the concrete for the slabs, columns, and walls with a concrete mix normally consisting of a one-inch 4000-psi mix.

"With basically no setup allowed around the building's perimeter, our Putzmeister equipment had to meet some difficult access issues head on," said Dan Navarro, owner of D&N Concrete Pumping. "The units were selected based on their versatility and reach features. For instance, the Multi-Z boom models could snake in and around obstacles. The compact outrigger spreads and low unfolding heights of the smaller units allowed setup in confined areas, and the longer reach of the bigger boom pumps gave us access to long distance or excessive 170-foot vertical heights,"

Navarro went on to say, "And to accommodate the tight time schedule, we pumped concrete at full volume and pressure whenever possible. Fortunately we get both high pressure and high output with our Putzmeister pumps — and that's without modifying the equipment."

Time - Another Critical Factor
Besides lots of overtime for the construction crews, the larger pumps also did double duty. Time-efficient ways were devised to better utilize the two operators needed for every boom pump over 36-meters, as the law in Southern California requires. For instance, the 52Z would reach up 170-foot (52m) heights to pour the upper wall sections in four-foot increments, while an operator stood atop the structure using the pump's proportional radio remotes.

While the section cured for an hour, the ground operator would convert the 52Z pump to cable remote and handle concreting projects at lower levels. As all this could be accomplished in the same setup, full boom utilization was possible in saving time and expense for the contractor.

In the interest of time and necessity, D&N's Telebelt TB 105 conveyor was called upon for all back-filling demands during various construction phases. Because a front-end loader couldn't reach over the top of 40-foot (12m) walls to place rock on the other side, the Telebelt telescoped out to place more than 100,000 tons (90,720 metric tons) of base materials.

Crane time was at a premium and at a slower pace of placing concrete than desired for renovating the adjoining 560-room, 24-story hotel. The faster approach was to use a team of Putzmeister equipment - the MXR 32/36 separate placing boom with its 105-foot (32m) horizontal reach and the TG 10 square tower with its uniquely designed hydraulic self-climbing configuration.

This special configuration used two hydraulic cylinders with power supplied by the pedestal to allow the placing boom to climb without crane assistance. Lightweight and easy to install corner details guided the tower inside the slab opening instead of using hardwood wedges to hold the tower in place.

Meanwhile, the high-pressure Putzmeister 14000 HP-D trailer-mounted pump and over 1500 lineal feet (458m) of 5-inch (125mm) delivery line handled the pumping at average outputs of 100 cubic yards an hour (76m3/hr). This arrangement avoided any large equipment setup in the street.

The Glitz and Glamour Means Revenue
Taking its place across the street from the famous Mann's Chinese Theatre, the Hollywood & Highland project is predicted to generate $265 million in economic growth, of which $7.7 million in new tax revenues will go to the city. A ripple effect throughout Hollywood and neighboring areas is estimated at $22 million annually in new spending, and over 2,430 permanent jobs will be created when the entire project is fully complete in March 2002.

JOB SPECS
Owner: TrizecHahn Development, San Diego

RETAIL
Design project architect: Ehrenkrantz, Eckstut, & Kuhn Architects Executive architect: Altoon & Porter, Los Angeles
General contractor: McCarthy Brothers Company, Newport Beach, Calif.
Pumping contractor: D & N Concrete Pumping, Gardena, Calif.
Ready-mix supplier: Catalina Pacific Concrete, San Fernando, Calif. Equipment: 16, 24Z, 28Z, 32S, 36, 42X, 46X, and 52Z-Meter Putzmeister boom pumps, Putzmeister Telebelt TB 105 telescopic belt conveyor

PREMIER KODAK THEATRE
Architect: Rockwell Group
General contractor: McCarthy Brothers Company, Newport Beach, Calif. Pumping contractor: D & N Concrete Pumping, Gardena, Calif.
Ready-mix supplier: Catalina Pacific Concrete, San Fernando, Calif. Equipment: 16, 24Z, 28Z, 32S, 36, 42X, 46X, and 52Z-Meter Putzmeister boom pumps, Putzmeister Telebelt TB 105 telescopic belt conveyor

HOTEL
Architect: Wimberly, Allison, Tong & Goo, Newport Beach, Calif.
Contractor: Matt Construction, Santa Fe, Calif.
Concrete Contractor: Prieto Construction, Irvine, Calif.
Pumping contractor: D & N Concrete Pumping, Gardena, Calif.
Ready-mix supplier: Catalina Pacific Concrete, San Fernando, Calif.
Equipment: Putzmeister MXR 32/36 placing boom, Putzmeister TG 10 tower and Putzmeister 14000 HP-D high-pressure trailer pump